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  • [Archive]
  • Journal of Pharmacopuncture
  • pISSN : 2093-6966
  • eISSN : 2234-6856
  • DB Construction : 59 Issues, 667 Articles
Year
Issues
Articles
1 Title
Keywords bee venom pharmacopuncture; intra-acupoint injection; intra-articular injection; knee osteoarthritis
Author(s) Seung-Hwon Lee, Gi-Sun Kwon, Min-Soo Kang, Hyun-Min Yoon, Cheol-Hong Kim
  Abstract Objectives: The purpose of this study is to compare the effects of bee venom pharmacopuncture (BVP) therapy according to the methods used to treat knee osteoarthritis (OA): intra-acupoint combined with intra-articular injection, intra-acupoint injection, and intra-articular injection. Methods: A total of 69 patients were recruited by the Department of Acupuncture & Moxibustion at Dong-Eui Oriental University Hospital from February 1 to July 23, 2012. The patients were assigned to 3 groups: the first group with intra-cupoint combined with intraarticular BVP Injection (the experimental group), the 2nd group with intra-acupoint BVP injection (control groupII), and the 3rd group with intra-articular BVP injection (control groupII). The participants were assigned in the order in which they were recruited. Treatments were done twice a week, for a total of 9 times. The effectiveness was assessed by using the visual analouge scale (VAS) and the Korea Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (KWOMAC). Results: All three groups exhibited significant VAS and KWOMAC effects. Moreover, the 4 week follow-up after the final treatment showed a persistence of BVP effects. However, when the groups were compared, no statistically significant differences in VAS and KWOMAC were noted, but when improvement was considered, the results showed that intra-articular injection was more effective than intra-acupoint injection. Especially, intra-acupoint combined with intra-articular injection was the most effective among the three treatments. Conclusions: Combining intra-acupoint with intraarticular injection, depending on the patient's symptoms, may produce better results when conservatively treating knee OA.
2 Title
Keywords Dioscoreae Rhizoma pharmacopuncture; gross grading system of House-Brackmann; peripheral facial paralysis; Yanagihara's unweighted grading system
Author(s) In-Soo Sung, Kwon-eui Hong, Min-Jung Kim, In Song
  Abstract Objectives: The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and the safety of Sanyak pharmacopuncture therapy for the treatment of peripheral facial paralysis patients. Methods: This study was a retrospective investigation of a total of 70 patients who were inpatients of the Oriental Hospital of Daejeon University between January 1, 2011, and May 31, 2012, and who were diagnosed as having peripheral facial paralysis by physical examination, the patients received three different interventions. Eleven (11) patients were treated with acupuncture and alcohol Dioscorea rhizoma pharmacopuncture (ADG), 25 patients with acupuncture and distillation Dioscorea rhizoma pharmacopuncture (DDG), and 34 patients with acupuncture and non-Dioscorea rhizoma pharmacopuncture (NDG). The resulting data were analyzed. Results: The changed H-B grades indicated significant improvements in all three groups, and the ADG and the DDG groups showed significant results after two weeks of treatment when compared to the NDG group. The changed y-Scores indicated significant improvements in all three groups, and the ADG group showed significant results after 10 and 15 days of treatment when compared to the NDG group. Dioscorea rhizoma pharmacopuncture may be safe for the human body because in most cases, the only abnormal finding was the pain could by the application of pharmacopuncture. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that Oriental medical treatment with dioscoreae Rhizoma (Sanyak) pharmacopuncture complex therapy may be effective and safe in patient with peripheral facial paralysis
3 Title
Keywords bee venom; Calculus Bovis-Fel Uris-Moschus; cerebrovascular circulation; pharmacopuncture; scolopendrid
Author(s) Soo-Jung Park, Ho-Young Lee, Tak-Hyun Yoon, Jong-Cheon Joo
  Abstract Objectives: This study was designed to investigate the effect of four pharmacopuncture drugs (scolopendrid, Calculus Bovis-Fel Uris-Moschus (BUM), bee venom 25%, and sweet bee venom 10%) on the cerebral hemodynamics, including changes in the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and in the mean arterial blood pressure (MABP). Methods: The changes in the rCBF and the MABP were determined by using a laser-Doppler flowmeter and a pressure transducer, respectively. Results: Scolopendrid (0.3 ml, 1 ml/kg) caused no significant changes in the rCBF and the MABP, whereas BUM (0.3 ml, 1 ml/kg) decreased the rCBF and the MABP, bee venom 25% (0.3 ml, 1 ml/kg) increased the rCBF and lowered the MABP, and sweet bee venom 10% (0.3 ml, 1 ml/kg) increased the rCBF and had no significant effect on the MABP. Conclusions: The rCBF and the MABP were influenced differently by the administration of various pharmacopunctures. Further studies are needed to elucidate the underlying mechanism.
4 Title
Keywords Rehmannia glutinosa pharmacopuncture solution (RGPS); cytokine, enzyme; FcεRI expression; FcεRImediated signaling
Author(s) Kyung-Hwa Kang, Kyung-Hee Lee, Hyun-Min Yoon, Kyung-Jeon Jang, Chun- Ho Song, Cheol-Hong Kim
  Abstract Objectives: This study was designed to investigate the effect of four pharmacopuncture drugs (scolopendrid, Calculus Bovis-Fel Uris-Moschus (BUM), bee venom 25%, and sweet bee venom 10%) on the cerebral hemodynamics, including changes in the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and in the mean arterial blood pressure (MABP). Methods: The changes in the rCBF and the MABP were determined by using a laser-Doppler flowmeter and a pressure transducer, respectively. Results: Scolopendrid (0.3 ml, 1 ml/kg) caused no significant changes in the rCBF and the MABP, whereas BUM (0.3 ml, 1 ml/kg) decreased the rCBF and the MABP, bee venom 25% (0.3 ml, 1 ml/kg) increased the rCBF and lowered the MABP, and sweet bee venom 10% (0.3 ml, 1 ml/kg) increased the rCBF and had no significant effect on the MABP. Conclusions: The rCBF and the MABP were influenced differently by the administration of various pharmacopunctures. Further studies are needed to elucidate the underlying mechanism.
5 Title
Keywords assistant and courier principle, cell viability, HepG2, minister, ONGABO, sovereign
Author(s) Jeong-Hun Shin, Seung-lyul Jun, Sung-Yeoun Hwang, Seong-Hun Ahn
  Abstract Objectives: This study used the basic principle of Oriental medicine, the sovereign, minister, assistant and courier principle (君臣佐使論) to investigate the effects of the component of ONGABO, which is composed of Ginseng Radix (Red Ginseng), Angelica Gigantis Radix, Schisandrae Fructus, Cuscuta Semen and Curcumae tuber on the viability of HepG2 cells. Methods: Single and mixed extracts of the component of ONGABO were prepared by lypohilizing powder of Red Ginseng (6-year root from Kanghwa), Angelica Gigantis Radix, Schisandrae Fructus, Cuscuta Semen, Curcumae Tuber (from Omniherb Co., Ltd., Korea) at the laboratory of herbal medicine in Woosuk University and were eluted after being macerated with 100% ethanol for three days. The cell viability of HepG2 was determined by using an absorptiometric analysis with PrestoBlue (Invitrogen) reagent after the plate had been incubated for 48 hours. All of the experiments were repeated three times to obtain the average value and standard deviation. The statistical analysis was done and the correlation factor was obtained by using Microsoft Office Excel 2007 and Origin 6.0 software. Results: Although Ginseng Radix (Red Ginseng) and Schisandrae Fructus did not enhance the viability of HepG2 cells, they were shown to provide protection of those cells. On the other hand, Angelica Gigantis Radix decreased the viability of HepG2 cells significantly, Cuscuta Semen and Curcumae Tuber had a small or no effect on the viability of HepG2 cells. Conclusions: In the sovereign, minister, assistant and courier principle (君臣佐使論), Ginseng Radix (Red Ginseng) corresponds to the sovereign component because it provides cell protection effects, Angelica Gigantis Radix corresponds to minister medicinal because it kills cells, Schisandrae Fructus corresponds to the assistant medicinal to help red ginseng having cell protect effects. Cuscuta Semen and Curcumae Tuber correspond to the courier medicinal having no effect in cell viability in HepG2. We hope this study provides motivation for advanced research on the sovereign, minister, assistant and courier principle.
6 Title
Keywords Bufonis venenum; bufadienolides; bufotoxin; HPLC; LC/MS; TLC;
Author(s) Hyo-Jae Lee, Fan-Pei Koung, Ki-Rok Kwon, Dae-In Kang, Lorenzo Cohen, Pei-Ying Yang, Hwa-Seung Yoo
  Abstract Objectives: Toad venom, called Chan-Su, is a traditional Oriental medicine secreted from the auricular and the skin glands of the Bufo bufo gargarizanz Cantor or B. melanosticus Schneider and has been widely used in China, Korea and other parts of Asia for the treatment of pain, heart conditions, and cancer. We examined the concentrations of the main chemical constituents within a commerciallyavailable toad venom product and compared the levels for different extraction methods. Methods: Toad venom was extracted using either cold or hot water, ethanol (EtOH), methanol (MeOH), or ethyl acetate (EtOAc), was fractionated using precipitation or reflux, and was then analyzed using thin layer chromatography (TLC), high-performance liquid chromatography (HTLC), and liquid chroma-tography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Individual components were identified by comparisons of the retention times, the ultraviolet spectra, and mass spectras and differences in chemical constituents for different solvents and extraction methods are presented. Results: Components with authentic standards, including serotonin and bufodienolides (cinobufagen, bufalin, cinobufalin, and resibufogenin), were detected. The water extract of toad venom contained the greatest amount of serotonin (75.7 ± 0.1 mg/g), but very small amounts of bufodienolides (3.8 ± 0.0 mg/g). In contrast, the use of MeOH or EtOH extraction solutions resulted in 5-26 times higher concentrations of bufodienolides, with only trace amounts of serotonin. The relative and the absolute concentrations of the component also varied based on the extraction method; i.e., EtOH extracts yielded the greatest total amounts of bufodienolides, and EtOAc precipitation had the lowest amounts of bufodienolides. Conclusions: Toad venom consists of serotonin and several bufodienolides, and the choice of solvent to extract chemical the constituents is important as a way to enrich the purported active components for treating different conditions.
7 Title
Keywords acupuncture; hypoglossal nerve; cranial nerve palsy; herbal medicine; pharmacopuncture
Author(s) Seung-Ho Sun
  Abstract Objective: This case report is to report the effect of Korean traditional treatment for idiopathic ninth, tenth, and twelfth cranial nerve palsy with ipsilateral headache. Methods: The medical history and imaging and laboratory test of a 39-year-old man with cranial palsy were tested to identify the cause of disease. A 0.2-mL dosage of Hwangyeonhaedoktang pharmacopuncture was administered at CV23 and CV17, respectively. Acupuncture was applied at P06, Li05, TE05, and G37 on the right side of the body. Zhuapiandutongbang (在偏頭痛方) was administered at 30 minutes to 1 hour after mealtime three times a day. The symptoms were investigated using Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Results: The results of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and laboratory tests were normal. The medical history showed no trauma, other illnesses, family history of diseases, medications, smoking, drinking and so on. All symptoms disappeared at the 10th day of treatment. Conclusion: Korean traditional treatment such as acupuncture, pharmcopuncture, and herbal medicine for the treatment of ninth, tenth, and twelfth cranial nerve palsy of unknown origin is suggested to be effective even though this conclusion is based on a single.